JIM MAKES: “Brie Butter”

Sorry for so many food posts lately… but let’s face it: once you get to be 48 years-old, your days of chasing women, drowning in whiskey and going on peyote-fueled vision quests with Jim Morrison’s ghost are over. So… FOOD IT IS, THEN!

“Compound butter” is what happens when you let butter sit out to soften, then mix in some stuff, then put the butter back in the fridge to firm up again. The “stuff” you put in the butter can be a liquid, like wine or honey (hmmmm… honey butter!). It can be spices and herbs, like the garlic-herb butter on top of your steak. But it can also be… cheese!

This post at The Takeout talks about “brie butter”. You just get 8 ounces of good Irish or French butter and an equal amount of brie cheese.

Brie Butter 2

Cut the rind off the brie, cut both into small-ish cubes, then mix in a food processor until it becomes a smooth paste. You’ll probably need to stop several times and push the butter\cheese mixture down the side of the processor bowl with a spatula, by the way.

Brie Butter

The traditional thing to do would be to put a thick line of the stuff on a piece of plastic wrap, then use the plastic wrap to form it into a summer sausage-sized log… which is why the garlic-herb butter you get on your steak at restaurants is often shaped as a perfect disc. But I’m lazy, so I just put mine into a Chinese takeout soup container.

Let me just say that this stuff is the Truth and the Light. And the post at The Takeout knocks it out of the park when it says:

Somehow, both ingredients come through in equal measure; it’s almost like they agreed to take turns. You get hit with the brie right up front, but then the cheese yields to its counterpart, giving way to a creamy, buttery finish.

They’re spot-on: the brie and butter somehow compliment each other perfectly, the flavor of one fading out while the other gently takes over. This stuff is absolutely delicious – sinfully delicious – and I’d recommend it to anyone!

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